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CONTACT:

Christina Amestoy

Vermont Democratic Party Communications Director

camestoy@vtdemocrats.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 29, 2016

 

Statement by State Treasurer Beth Pearce on the 7th Anniversary of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act

 

“The following is a statement by State Treasurer Beth Pearce:  

 

January 29th, marks the 7th anniversary of the signing of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act - a landmark bill signed by President Obama aimed at guaranteeing equal pay for equal work across genders. And while this was a strong step in the right direction and a needed public acknowledgement of the disparity that exists, it’s been 7 years, and more needs to be done.

 

In Vermont we value a job well done. We believe that those who work hard deserve compensation and that the compensation should be fair and equal across genders. But the paychecks women in this state take home compared to men do not reflect this. Right now, Vermont women make about 84 cents to every dollar Vermont men make. That translates to an average yearly income of $46,911 for men and $39,322 for women (AAUW, 2014).

 

This gap isn’t just numbers on a page. This has a real impact for our families across the state. Female workers may have a harder time paying off the student loans they took on to get the high-skilled jobs we’re working to foster in Vermont. They may have less financial flexibility to invest in a pension plan that will help guarantee them dignity in retirement. And for the single parent households in this state, single moms are bringing home an average of $5,000 less to help support their kids.

 

The lack of security and opportunity that the gender wage gap creates doesn’t just affect the wage-earner, it has consequences for our state’s entire economy. From the amount invested back into state businesses through the purchase of goods and services, to the level of reliance families have on state programs that need to be funded with tax dollars, equal pay is just good public policy.

 

As we kick off 2016, it’s time to speak up and make sure this issue gets the attention it deserves. Vermont is currently ranked 10th in the nation on the equal pay issue: not the best, not nearly the worst. But we can do better. This should not be a partisan issue, but a matter of both good economics and fairness. In a state where we believe we are at our strongest when we give equal opportunity and equal recognition for those who show up and work hard, we need to make sure we’re holding up our end of the bargain with Vermont women.

 

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CONTACT:

Christina Amestoy

Vermont Democratic Party Communications Director

camestoy@vtdemocrats.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 26, 2016

 

 

Vermont Democratic Party statement on Phil Scott’s Record on Paid Sick Leave

 

“In an interview with VT Digger on Monday, Lt. Gov. Phil Scott said he hadn’t decided where he stood on the issue of paid sick leave, but he seems to be forgetting the record he’s laid out for himself on the issue. Because it’s pretty clear to us that Phil Scott doesn’t believe it’s worth prioritizing Vermont workers’ well being.

In case he forgot, here are four times he opposed implementing paid sick days for Vermonters, and one weak attempt to walk his record back:

October 2014 Debate: Scott Answered “No” When Asked if Businesses Should Have to Offer Paid Sick Days to Employees. Scott was the only candidate to oppose required paid sick days for employees in the October debate. [VT Digger, 10/14/14]

 

 

February 2014 Chamber of Commerce Event: Scott Opposed Legislation Requiring Paid Sick Leave Calling it Counterproductive for Good Businesses. Scott told the audience that paid sick leave is just “one more thing that gets in the way of us being able to do what we do best, and do what we do best for our employees.” [Brattleboro Reformer, 2/10/14; VTDigger.org, 2/4/14]

 

 

December 2015: Scott Said “Paid Sick Leave is Something That I Think Would Fall Into That Category Of ‘We Don't Need That Right Now.’” Following his campaign announcement, Scott told WPTZ reporter that paid sick days aren’t necessary for Vermont workers.  [WPTZ, 12/3/15]

 

 

January 2016 Article Reporting that Paid Sick Leave Legislation was “Poised for Passage This Year in the Vermont Legislature” Noted that Scott “is Not in Favor of a Paid Sick Leave Law.” [VTDigger, 1/3/16]

 

 

January 2016: VT Digger Reported “Scott Says He Hasn’t Decided Whether He Will Support the Paid Sick Leave Bill. Scott attempted to walk back his record of oppositions and states, “I like the direction it’s going, and I’m happy to take a position on it once it’s out of committee.”  [VTDigger,1/26/16]

 

Just like his flip-flop on welcoming Syrian refugees to our state, it looks like Phil Scott is scrambling to correct his record on paid sick leave to finally align with what Vermonters really want.”

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CONTACT:

Christina Amestoy

Vermont Democratic Party Communications Director

camestoy@vtdemocrats.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 25, 2016

 

Vermont Democratic Party statement on Bruce Lisman’s Budget Response

 

“We’re used to hearing Republicans claim they support working families without ever offering up any proof. But even this common claim sounds particularly empty when it’s coming from someone who made his money on Wall Street. It seems that former Bear Stearns executive, Bruce Lisman, is confused about who makes up our workforce.

 

The Governor’s plans to increase the registration fee on mutual funds, currently the lowest in New England, doesn’t hurt working families, it invests in them. By making Wall Street corporations pay a little more, every child born in Vermont will have a $250 saving account to help prepare them for college and give them better chance at a secure future. This will come as a welcome relief to Vermont college students, 65% of whom will graduate with $29,060 in debt. It will come as an even bigger relief to those who cannot afford a higher education at all.

 

If Lisman thinks more Vermonters are worried about mutual funds than their children’s education, he doesn’t understand Vermont priorities. Mr. Lisman may have retired from Wall Street, but it's clear his loyalties still remain with big business, not working families.”

 

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Paid for by the Vermont Democratic Party and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.

www.vtdemocrats.org; P.O. Box 1220 Montpelier, VT 05602; (802) 229-1783; Printed in house

CONTACT:

Christina Amestoy

Vermont Democratic Party Communications Director

camestoy@vtdemocrats.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 22, 2016

 

Vermont Democratic Party statement on Phil Scott’s Refusal to Support Vermont Workers

 

As Vermonters, we come together when someone in our community needs a hand. It’s just what we do. Because it’s common sense that our communities are strongest when everyone is on their feet. But Lt. Gov. Phil Scott seems to disagree.

 

It’s this Vermont value that’s at the core of our support for earned sick leave. We believe working Vermonters should have the helping hand they deserve if they, or a loved one falls ill. Because no Vermonter should have choose between taking steps to get better and a paycheck. And no employer should worry about maintaining a healthy and safe workplace.

 

But Phil Scott doesn’t get that. Instead, he thinks it’s right to ignore the uncertainty that our workers currently face.  Calling the proposal for two earned sick days a year unnecessary, Scott has turned his back on average Vermonters to take a stance that puts him in line with national Republicans like Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio. He’s even isolated himself from Vermont businesses that have come out in support of the proposal and their employees.

 

Phil Scott is standing with his big donors instead of hard working Vermonters on earned sick leave. His refusal to value our workers shows that he’s just another politician who’s wrong for Vermont.

 

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Paid for by the Vermont Democratic Party and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.

www.vtdemocrats.org; P.O. Box 1220 Montpelier, VT 05602; (802) 229-1783; Printed in house

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